pouring-powder.jpg

Forms of  Medication

Core Veterinary Compounding Pharmacy provides the Veterinary community with focus on healthcare and extensive prescription services. Making sure our clients and their pets or animals are healthy and happy is our top priority. We’re committed to doing what we can to make sure customers receive the correct medication, strength, and dosage form to fit their specific needs.  Have questions? Give us a call. We are happy to provide answers and share all we have to offer.

 

Capsules

What is a Capsule?

It is the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) encapsulated in a hard gelatin shell. Almost all medications can be formulated as handmade capsules,  though the size of the capsules may vary depending on the volume of medication needed.

How are Capsules Given?

Pet owners should carefully administer the capsules each time in order to prevent choking. Depending on your pet’s preferences, it may also be possible to open up the capsule and mixing the content into your pet’s dry or wet food bowl to help diffuse the taste of the medication. Capsules can be placed in pill pockets or folded into their favorite treat.

What are the Pros and Cons of a Capsule?

Great way to mask bitter/bad tasting medication and some sizes are small enough to hide in food. It is the right concentration, strength, and combination of medications into hard gelatin shells that have no flavor. No flexible dosing adjustment.

Chew Treats

Our chewables only consist of your pet’s prescribed medication, a glycerin/gelatin, a base, and optional natural flavorings or colorings to mask the medication’s taste, look, and smell. Almost all medications can be formulated as handmade chewables. 

 
What is a Chewable?

Soft chew treats are the perfect way to disguise medication. The yummy chews make medicating the patient a treat, and each chew is individually packaged to retain freshness.

How are Chewables given?

The chewables are small, soft, and easy to swallow, so you can either administer the medication on its own as a “treat” or mix the medication in your pet’s wet or dry food bowl. The chewables are conveniently sliceable for administering smaller dosages at a time or for further disguising the taste of medication. Even pets who have difficulty biting or chewing will not have a problem with chewables, thanks to their soft gelatinous consistency.

What are the Pros and Cons of a Chewable?

Many pets may find it difficult to swallow capsules or liquids, but all pets love treats, so chewable medications are a perfect alternative dosage form. Flavor can be added to improve palatability. Pricing might be slightly higher than other medication forms.

 

Ointments​

What is an Ointment?

Medication (Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient) incorporated into an ointment base.

How are Ointments given?

Applied topically on the skin or into the ear

What are the Pros and Cons of an Ointment?

Ointment sticks to the skin for a longer period of time to allow the medication to absorption. Ointments are formulated to maximize the contact time with the affected area. Pets need to be shielded from trying to lick or scratch the area where ointment was applied (face cones might be needed).

 

Pastes

What is a Paste?

Medication (active ingredient) incorporated into a paste-like base for oral administration.

How are Pastes given?

Given orally directly into mouth.  This method is most effective if you need precise dosing or if your animal does not have a good appetite.

 
What are the Pros and Cons of a Paste?

Adjustable and customized dosing and can be flavored to maximize palatability.

 

Powders

What is a Powder?

Medication (active ingredient) mixed with sugar or lactose base.

How are Powders given?

It is poured over the animal's feed or mixed in with their favorite treat, like apple sauce.

What are the Pros and Cons of a Powder?

Easy administering, just has to be poured over their feed and can be flavored to increase palatability. This method of administering is not recommended when precise dosing is needed.

 
 

Suspension / Solutions - Liquids

This formulation may be most suitable for pets who are incapable of swallowing pills and capsules whole or who do not have the appetite to eat chewable.

What is a Suspension?

Active ingredient (medication) suspended in a liquid (oil or water-based) to ensure precise dosing and ease of administration as well as masking the bitter taste of medication. Shake well before administering.

 

What is a Solution?

When the active ingredient is completely dissolved in the base and will not separate. No need to shake it up. These formulations are normally water-based and do not have a long expiration date.

How are Suspensions and Solutions used?

Owners may choose to mix the liquid medication into their pet’s wet or dry food bowl to be consumed alongside a meal. This method is most effective if your medication does not have a strong taste or if your pet has a larger appetite. Other pet owners may choose to directly administer the liquid medication into their pet’s mouth using a syringe dosage accuracy. 

What are the Pros and Cons of a Suspension or Liquid?

Liquid formulations are the most versatile dosage form of veterinary medications, so it is an excellent dosage form to start out with if your pet is unaccustomed to taking medication. They offer a wide range of flavoring options and flexible dosing adjustments.

 

Tablets

What is a Tablet?

Tablets are a tightly-packed, solid form of oral medication and are the most traditional dosage form. They are useful for formulating compounded medication, which often adjusts and combines existing medications and dosages.

How are Tablets given?

Pet owners should carefully administer the tablets each time in order to prevent choking. Depending on your pet’s preferences, it may also be possible to administer your pet’s medication by grinding tablets into powder form and mixing this into your pet’s dry or wet food bowl to help diffuse the taste of the medication. Tablets can be placed in pill pockets or folded into their favorite treat.

 
How to Pill a Cat
What are the Pros and Cons of a Tablet?

Great way to mask bitter/bad tasting medication and small enough to hide in food. It is the right concentration, strength, and combination of medications. It can be used for flexible dosing adjustment.

Tiny Tabs

These tablets are small enough to be able to give to cats and dogs that have a hard time swallowing bigger tablets.

Scored Tablets

These tablets are very convenient if you need to break the tablet in half for flex dosing.

Quad Tabs

These tablets are used to maximize flex dosing. This gives the caregiver the opportunity to adjust dosing by using only one tablet.

 

Transdermal

What is a Transdermal?

Transdermal medications are formulated as highly concentrated topical creams or gels that are directly applied directly to your pet’s affected area to maximize transdermal absorption or to your pet’s pinna, or ear flap, where there is typically very little fur.

How are Transdermals given?

These transdermal formulations are easy for pet owners to administer at home using a syringe for an accurate gel dosage or simply using their hands to smear cream onto the skin. Pet owners should also prevent their own skin from being exposed to their pet’s compounded transdermal creams or gels by wearing disposable gloves when administering medication.

What are the Pros and Cons of a Transdermal?

This makes transdermal medications appropriate substitutes for any pets who suffer from nausea, oral health conditions, digestive conditions, or other oral health conditions that may prevent them from taking a pill, capsule, chewable, or liquid formulations  (almost all medications can be formulated as transdermal creams or gels).

How to Apply a Transdermal

© 2020    by Core  Veterinary Compounding Pharmacy